1. evanescen-t:

    tryingtomakesenseofpeople:

    kyuubijrr:

    pitchblackglow:

    foxgrl:

    gokusgirl:

    funkycops:

    imperfectwriting:

    I went to the mall, and a little girl called me a terrorist. 

    My name is Ela.  I am seventeen years old.  I am not Muslim, but my friend told me about her friend being discriminated against for wearing a hijab.  So I decided to see the discrimination firsthand to get a better understanding of what Muslim women go through. 

    My friend and I pinned scarves around our heads, and then we went to the mall.  Normally, vendors try to get us to buy things and ask us to sample a snack.  Clerks usually ask us if we need help, tell us about sales, and smile at us.  Not today.  People, including vendors, clerks, and other shoppers, wouldn’t look at us.  They didn’t talk to us.  They acted like we didn’t exist.  They didn’t want to be caught staring at us, so they didn’t look at all. 

    And then, in one store, a girl (who looked about four years old) asked her mom if my friend and I were terrorists.  She wasn’t trying to be mean or anything.  I don’t even think she could have grasped the idea of prejudice.  However, her mother’s response is one I can never forgive or forget.  The mother hushed her child, glared at me, and then took her daughter by the hand and led her out of the store. 

    All that because I put a scarf on my head.  Just like that, a mother taught her little girl that being Muslim was evil.  It didn’t matter that I was a nice person.  All that mattered was that I looked different.  That little girl may grow up and teach her children the same thing. 

    This experiment gave me a huge wakeup call.  It lasted for only a few hours, so I can’t even begin to imagine how much prejudice Muslim girls go through every day.  It reminded me of something that many people know but rarely remember: the women in hijabs are people, just like all those women out there who aren’t Muslim. 

    People of Tumblr, please help me spread this message.  Treat Muslims, Jews, Christians, Buddhists, Hindus, Pagans, Taoists, etc., exactly the way you want to be treated, regardless of what they’re wearing or not wearing, no exceptions.  Reblog this.  Tell your friends.  I don’t know that the world will ever totally wipe out prejudice, but we can try, one blog at a time.  

    coming up next on white people solve racism

    muslim women dont need your white saviour attitude, you might now finally realise what it’s like to be excluded from society because of a piece of garment but you’re never going to experience it in the way we do.

    she literally worded this so well and so honestly and tried so hard not to be rude, she just tried to understand what you go through. she’s not trying to be a saviour, she’s trying to raise awareness. she never said she’d solve anything or experience it like you do. stop doing exactly what other people do to you and shut down someones ideas just because of their color or religion or anything. this is a valid and completely pure hearted thing. 

    ^

    It’s funny how people act like white people are the biggest douchebags, and then act like total asshats themselves, huh?

    She did this to get a GLIMPSE into the shit Muslim women are put through. She never claimed total understanding; in fact she said that she “can’t even begin to imagine how much prejudice Muslim girls go through every day.” She ADMITTED that she doesn’t know everything these women go through, and yet she’s STILL attacked? I cannot fathom why it’s deemed “okay” to be prejudiced against white people, even when we try to understand what it is people of other ethnicities/skin tones/nationalities/religions/etc go through. If you want, we can stop trying to understand and let everyone wallow in their self-pity.

    Welcome to tumblr

    important

    argumentum ad hominem

    (Source: olentaalla, via kellyfornia)

     

  2. "

    Remember that intimate conversation you had with your son? The one where you said, “I love you and I need you to know that no matter how a woman dresses or acts, it is not an invitation to cat call, taunt, harass or assault her”?

    Or when you told your son, “A woman’s virginity isn’t a prize and sleeping with a woman doesn’t earn you a point”?

    How about the heart-to-heart where you lovingly conferred the legal knowledge that “a woman doesn’t have to be fighting you and you don’t have to be pinning her down for it to be RAPE. Intoxication means she can’t legally consent, NOT that she’s an easy score.”

    Or maybe you recall sharing my personal favorite, “Your sexual experiences don’t dictate your worth just like a woman’s sexual experiences don’t dictate hers.”

    Last but not least, do you remember calling your son out when you discovered he was using the word “slut” liberally? Or when you overheard him talking about some girl from school as if she were more of a conquest than a person?

    I want you to consider these conversations and then ask yourself why you don’t remember them. The likely reason is because you didn’t have them. In fact, most parents haven’t had them.

    "
    — 

    The Conversation You Must Have With Your Sons | Carina Kolodny  (via albinwonderland)

    What’s scary is that you KNOW the majority of young men receive the OPPOSITE kinds of messages both from their parents and the culture around them. And then people are surprised or defensive when a so-called “good” guy takes advantage of a women. And excuses are made to make her at fault, rather than blaming the perpetrator and all those who taught him for his entire life that what he did wasn’t really wrong. Rape culture is a cycle, and education like that shown above is what can help break it down.

    (via misandry-mermaid)

    (Source: iamnotafeministtbh, via kellyfornia)

     
  3. gavinscreamingmichaelyelling:

    time-is-a-many-splendored-thing:

    douglasmurphy:

    rainbowcoffin:

    c-h-0-w:

    nightwife:

    Always reblog

    Woah

    well he really should have worn more protective clothing if he didn’t want that to happen
    sounds to me like he was asking for it

    Are we really sure he was actually shot and decapitated? Idk, sounds like something he would’ve made up. Guys make false decapitation accusations all the time, you know. 

    If he didn’t want to be decapitated, he shouldn’t have worn a shirt that showed off his neck

    I mean, not all woman decapitate people. I’m not like that.

    (Source: suzziepsyche, via kellyfornia)

     
  4. superblyhenkoff:

    kittydoom:

    exgynocraticgrrl:

    Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

     (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter,
     Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.

    MIC DROP

    yes.

    (via kellyfornia)

     
  5. (Source: flickr.com)

     
  6. (Source: Flickr / -icyj-)

     
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  9. "

    But women can never be careful enough, can we? If we take naked pictures of ourselves, we’re asking for it. If someone can manage to hack into our accounts, we’re asking for it. If we’re not wearing anti-rape nail polish, we’re asking for it. If we don’t take self-defence classes, we’re asking for it. If we get drunk, we’re asking for it. If our skirts are too short, we’re asking for it. If we pass out at a party, we’re asking for it. If we are not hyper-vigilant every single fucking second of every single fucking day, we are asking for it. Even when we are hyper-vigilant, we’re still asking for it. The fact that we exist is asking for it.

    This is what rape culture looks like.

    This is what misogyny looks like.

    "